"SEED sown to eternity." - (German Epitaph.)

Flowers which Death hath planted, God shall gather. - A.

The night is long, but the day which follows is everlasting. - A.

Death is not the end, but the regeneration of life. - A.

A Flower which God hath transplanted into his garden. - A.

Very terrible is the valley of the shadow of death, but it is the narrow way which leads to the garden of Paradise. - A.

Life is full of trials, but they are often like sign-posts, to guide us to a heavenly home. - A.

Life is often the Furnace which is intended to purify the soul for heaven. - A.

Death is dark and gloomy, but to the Christian it is only the cloud which hides the sunshine of heaven. - A.

Here lies a pardoned sinner: Reader, look to the same Saviour, and you will obtain the same grace. - C.

Tread lightly o'er this grave, for it contains precious, because ransomed, dust. - C.

" Life how short, Eternity how long !"

Weep not for the dead, for they are but sleeping, and those that sleep in Christ shall God bring with Him. - A.

Death is the close of time, the commencement of eternity. - M.

To him Life was trusting faith, Death attained reality. - M.

The Flowers which God hath planted, God hath plucked. - M.

Life maintains a continuous struggle between the flesh and spirit. Death celebrates the soul triumphant over the body. - M.

While we linger on the shore of Life, a wave wafts us to Eternity. M.

"Waiting for the coming of Christ."

''It is well.''

Reader, the same Saviour died for you and for me: pray that you may be more worthy of Him than I was. - A.

Reader, I was once living as thou art: remember that one day thou wilt be as I am now. - A.

This is a sinner's grave: pray that thou also enter not into temptation. - A.

"Christians, hope and pray."

Reader, live to-day to the glory of God: how knowest thou whether thou shalt live to-morrow? - A.

We are not dead, but waiting. - A.

"What I gave, I have;
What I spent I had;
What I left, I lost by not giving it."
(Tomb of Thomas Ravenscroft, 1708. Westminster Abbey.)

"O thou that passest by, revere the waiting dead."
(MARTIN F. TUPPER.)

"O Death, what art thou? an husbandman that reapeth always,
Out of season, as in season, with the sickle in his hand."
(TUPPER.)

"How full of dread, how full of hope, loometh inevitable death:
Of dread, for all have sinned; of hope, for One hath saved."
(TUPPER.)

"Death is the gift of Life, but Life is the gift of Death."
(Epitaph of Fazio Cardan. Milan.)

"To-day the man is here, to-morrow he hath disappeared.

"To-morrow is uncertain, - how knowest thou thou shalt live till to-morrow?

"Happy is he that always hath the hour of his death before his eyes, and daily prepareth himself to die.

"Whilst thou hast time, heap to thyself everlasting riches.

"Keep thy heart free, and lifted up to God, because here thou hast no abiding city.

"Very quickly will there be an end of thee here, look what will become of thee in another world."
(THOMAS A KEMPIS.)

Death draws a veil alike over the virtues and vices of life. Let us hope and pray . M.

To him Life was a long combat, Death a glorious victory. - M.

Weakness yields to strength, - the Creature surrenders to the Creator. M.

Death is the shadowy twilight which is the presage of a fadeless dawn. M.

Death is a goal never, a gate ever. M.

Death brings a long night of dreamless slumber, awakening to an endless morn. - M.

" Seed sown in the field of God, to ripen unto immortality.''
(Epitaph of Meta Klopstock.)

Weep not! he who was in life an heir, has in death attained an heritage. - M.